Aid and Development

Ziplock bags full of Metformin, a medication used to treat diabetes, donated to Seattle's Salaam Cultural Museum for delivery to Syrian refugees in Jordan. (Photo by Alisa Reznick)

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Collecting unused meds and giving them to needy people overseas isn’t legal. But some Seattleites are doing it anyways.

Carol Glenn, a former Seattle nurse, collected leftover HIV/AIDS drugs to send overseas. It wasn't legal, but Glenn believed it was her duty. (Photo by Isolde Raftery / KUOW)

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At the height of the AIDS crisis, nurse Carol Glenn ran a secret pipeline to get leftover drugs from Seattle to sick people in the developing world.

From left to right, Laune Torres, Rosie Dino, Elaine and Jill Mangiliman read a letter aloud to Jennifer Laude in mourning, authored by Katrina Pestano.

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Activists gathered Sunday in a vigil for a trans woman in the Philippines who was allegedly murdered by a U.S. marine stationed there.

A beachside building in Majuro, capital of the Marshall Islands. (Photo by Mrlins from Flickr)

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Hailing from a tiny island nation ravaged by American nuclear testing, a growing population of Marshall islanders are struggling to make a home here without access to citizenship.

Pastor George Everett speaking to Mercer Island Presbyterian Church about the Ebola outbreak in his home country of Liberia. (Photo by Sarah Stuteville)

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Liberian-Americans say they have the knowledge to help contain the outbreak in their home country, but they don't have the money

A WWII era poster encourages saving food scraps to feed animals. (Photo from National Archives)

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Kirkland resident Gina VanLoon hardly has any food waste in her compost bin. But that isn’t something she could brag about a few months ago....

(Photo from National Archives)

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Is the solution to feeding a growing global population sitting right there on our plates?

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A grassroots conference last weekend brought African farming leaders to Seattle to take on a green revolution they say is more about profit then poverty alleviation.

Hugo Lucitante pilots a boat on the Ecuadorian Amazon, on the land of the Cofan people, which is threatened by oil extraction. (Photo courtesy Oil and Water)

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Local documentary, “Oil & Water,” tells the story of an Ecuadorean tribe endangered by global warming and oil extraction, an ambassador from that tribe in Seattle and his friendship with a man who helps certify oil companies as environmentally friendly.

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As world leaders debate climate change in New York, Fiji and other Pacific Islands are feeling the impacts first hand.

David La at the UW’s Baker Laboratory is part of a team working on potential Ebola treatments, but they’re also crowdsourcing ideas over the Internet relating to a cure. (Photo by Mark Harrison / The Seattle Times)

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As Ebola spreads at alarming rates in West Africa, local labs are leading the race for an effective treatment.

A market stall in Grand Gedeh County, Liberia, which is so far still relatively Ebola-free and remains under quarantine. (Photo by Karin Huster)

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A Seattleite working on Ebola relief in Liberia reports a dismal lack of resources and staff on the front lines.

A family at a refugee camp in Thailand, where there are still 150,000 UN-recognized refugees unable to return home to Burma. (Photo by Mikhail Esteves)

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Seattleites are donating 'one night out' this weekend to help Burmese refugees who've been forgotten by big international donors.

A Water 1st supporter sporting a shirt that says the name of the organization in Amharic, the official language of Ethiopia. (Photo by Aida Solomon)

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Seattle has a huge global aid sector, and a big immigrant population. So why aren't they working together more?

Lee Robinson shows off freshly roasted beans from the Ometepe Island in Nicaragua. (Photo by Hannah Myrick)

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What started as a Reagan-era political protest has grown into a thirty year relationship driven by the Northwest's love of coffee.

Climbers in the midst of a small avalanche during an Everest ascent. (Photo by Lloyd Smith)

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Members of the Northwest Sherpa community are collecting money to aid the families of Sherpas killed in April’s big avalanche on Mount Everest, and some are rethinking their careers as mountain guides.

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Alcoholism, domestic violence, corruption, poverty — the deck is stacked against the women of high altitude indigenous communities in Veracruz. But an upstart human rights group is helping them turn the tables.

Shanta Darnal attended school in Kathmandu thanks to Western donations. (Photo by Amy Benson)

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Girls’ education is often seen as a panacea for global development. One promising Nepalese student's suicide reveals a more complicated picture.

Shanghai, China shrouded in smog. Overall China emits 6.2 metric tons of CO2 per year. (Photo from Wikipedia)

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University of Washington research points to air pollution, tobacco, and diet as the deadliest drivers of disease in China.

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After six months of fighting, South Sudan is now considered the world’s most fragile county.

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Nairobi's thrift shop fashion scene will have you rethinking your style.