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The Hindu temple in Kent reported broken windows and graffiti scrawled on the wall in the past week — the second vandalism at a Hindu temple in the Seattle area in the past few weeks.

Staff at the Sanatan Dharma Temple discovered that overnight Thursday, someone had broken windows at the temple and scrawled the word “FEAR” on the wall.

The Kent Police Department told KOMO TV on Sunday that preliminary information doesn’t show that most recent vandalism in Kent had a racial or religious motivation.

The Feb. 26 incident followed two weeks after the Hindu Temple and Cultural Center in Bothell was targeted by graffiti.

In the Feb. 15 incident in Bothell, someone had written “GET OUT” on the exterior wall of the temple on the exterior wall of the temple. At nearby Skyview High School someone had scrawled the words “Muslims get out,” sparking concerns that some communities, including Hindus, are being attacked for being perceived to be Muslim.

Last week, Hindu and Muslim leaders gathered together, calling for an FBI investigation of the Bothell vandalism as a hate crime.

This year, the FBI expanded its collection of information about religious hate crimes to include hate crimes targeting Hindus, Sikhs, Mormons, Buddhists, Jehova’s Witnesses and Orthodox Christians. FBI officials also said the bureau will collect information on anti-Arab bias as motivation of crimes.

The media descend upon the Hindu Temple and Cultural Center in Bothell, after it was vandalized. (Photo by Ayesh Photography via CAIR-WA.)

The media at the Hindu Temple and Cultural Center in Bothell where local Hindu and Muslim leaders gathered to call for an FBI investigation of the recent vandalism there as a hate crime. (Photo by Ayesh Photography via CAIR-WA.)

The Capitol Hill club uses their name against Bruce Lee's image to promote their venue. (Photo from Chop Suey Facebook page)

The Capitol Hill club uses their name against Bruce Lee’s image to promote their venue. (Photo from Chop Suey Facebook page)

It’s hard to believe that an alternative music club known for its diverse acts in politically correct Seattle has been called the Chop Suey for 13 years. It’s even more surprising to me that no one has made a big fuss about it until this year.

Andy Allen, an elementary school teacher and bassist for all people of color dance band My Parade, saw an opportunity to challenge the venue’s name when he heard new club owners, Brian Houck, Erin Carnes, and Brianna Rettig from Chicago, Minneapolis, and Los Angeles, respectively, would be taking over and making renovations to the club. On Jan. 27, he sent and published an open letter asking Rettig to consider renaming the venue.

Though he wants to have a conversation with the new owners about this before its soft reopening on March 6, the likelihood that this will happen seems to be waning every day. To this day, Allen has not heard back from them.

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Hundreds join in a Muslim prayer at the beginning of Seattle’s vigil held in Westlake Park in honor of Deah Shaddy Barakat, 23, his wife, Yusor Mohammad Abu-Salha, 21, and her sister, Razan Mohammad Abu-Salha, 19. (Photo by Alex Garland)

As the last of the sun ducked behind the glowing Pike Place Market sign on Feb. 14, the Muslim call to prayer rang through Seattle’s Westlake Park during an evening vigil in memory of Chapel Hill shooting victims Deah Shaddy Barakat, 23, his wife, Yusor Mohammad Abu-Salha, 21, and her sister, Razan Mohammad Abu-Salha, 19.

Hundreds of Muslims gathered together, laid their mats on the cement and listened to recited verses from the Quran, which included verse 3:125:

“Yes, if you remain patient and conscious of God and the enemy come upon you [attacking] in rage, your Lord will reinforce you with five thousand angels having marks [of distinction].”

Coincidentally, about 5,000 people of all faiths attended the funeral just a few days prior in North Carolina for the three victims. The three students of University of North Carolina were fatally shot by a neighbor on Feb. 10 at their apartment complex near the school campus in Chapel Hill.

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Family members of Antonio Zambrano-Montes gather outside of Pasco City Hall to protest the shooting. (Photo courtesy of Anna King / Northwest News Network)

Family members of Antonio Zambrano-Montes gather outside of Pasco City Hall to protest the shooting. (Photo courtesy of Anna King / Northwest News Network)

Dozens of bystanders witnessed Pasco police officers shoot at Antonio Zambrano-Montes over thirteen times on Tuesday.

It was the latest in a string of recent incidents where Pasco police have used deadly force against citizens, and evoked an angry response from locals and family members who gathered outside Pasco City Hall yesterday.