6 COMMENTS

  1. Please add Denny International Middle School and Chief Sealth International High School to your list (Seattle Public Schools). Students who have gone through the K-5 dual language program at Concord International will be 6th graders at Denny IMS this fall. Denny IMS has been running a dual language program for the past four years and Chief Sealth IHS is launching a dual language program this fall. At CSIHS, students in the DL program will be able to take social studies classes in Spanish along with upper level Spanish language classes. This will provide a K-12 dual language pathway from Concord to Denny to Chief Sealth.

    • Thanks for this info Noah! We’ve added Denny and Sealth to the list. Can you give us the time split for both of those programs–and are we correct that both are Spanish/English?

      • Hello!

        I teach at Denny and will be teaching Dual Language social studies this year. At Denny, our students have 1/3 of their day in Spanish. They have a reading/writing class and a social studies class in Spanish.

        Also, Hamilton International Middle School has a continuation immersion program from John Stanford International School that has one period of Spanish or Japanese per day. The students then can continue in high school at Ingraham, where students are integrated into the Spanish and Japanese language programs there.

  2. The author’s friend may want to check out El Centro de la Raza’s dual language, day care and pre-school programs on Beacon Hill. It is Spanish/English, accredited by NAEYCanime pre-K classes are funded by the city and other organizations because it is a designated high quality, early learning center.

  3. I really want to believe #5. In programs without large numbers of native speakers, how are the Immersion IAs paid for? As per the MacDonald PTA budget, they are spending close to $350K on immersion supports:
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    http://s3.amazonaws.com/hoth.bizango/assets/11233/PTA_Immersion_Support_Budget_09-09-2013.pdf
    .
    Bravo to PTAs that can raise those kinds of funds but how can you achieve equitable access to LI if it costs so much to implement well? I admit that my knowledge on this is shallow. I welcome a more in depth explanation of how the costs don’t exceed other schools. Thanks!

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