Rejecting the American Dream, Mexicans reintegrate back home

Versión en Español a continuación

(Photo by Quinn Dombrowski via Flickr)
(Photo by Quinn Dombrowski via Flickr)

Mexico City native Nelly Lozano lived what some might consider the American Dream. Meanwhile, she actually dreamt of returning to Mexico.

Lozano had a college education, a high-paying job at Boeing that paid for an “almost brand-new” car and a quiet, comfortable home in Renton.

According to a 2014 Pew Research Center survey one-third of Mexicans say they would capitalize on the opportunity to migrate to the U.S. if given a legal opportunity like Lozano’s (and about 17 percent say they would move even without documentation).

Lozano, meanwhile, drove to work each day and drudged home, if only for the sake of her son’s future.

After years of repetition, it dawned on her that she could provide for her son without that almost-new car and an impressive salary. Maybe, she thought, she could even spend more time with him than the few precious hours her current nine to five position allowed.

“What are you doing here?” she asked herself. “Why do you live here if you’re not happy — if you’re not completely happy?”

So in 2011, she left.

Thousands of other Mexicans, across classes and ages, education levels and legal statuses take the same plunge each year, opting to return home from the U.S.

Most Mexicans Would Not Move to U.S.

The transition can be less-than-seamless, though. Immigrants who return face a range of challenges: finding work, reintegrating into their communities or even facing stigmas.

Still, many agree: it’s worth it.

“People may think, ‘What are you doing?’ if you move back,” Lozano said. “Like, ‘you’re stupid. You have a good job. You have school for your son.’ All of these good things, right? All of these opportunities.”

“But if you’re not happy,” she said, “and you’re just fulfilling other people’s points of view, then that’s not good.”

About 90 percent of the approximately 1.4 million Mexican immigrants who returned home from the U.S. between 2005 and 2010 did so voluntarily (rather than through deportation). Some found less economic prosperity in the U.S. than they imagined. Others experienced irreparable alienation. Some, like Lozano, say they just missed their families and culture.

Pew Mexican migration expert Jeffrey Passel says the rate of net migration between the U.S. and Mexico remained close to zero until 2012, and evidence suggests it’s still flat today.

Unlike some Mexicans who immigrate to the U.S., Lozano says she never wanted to come in the first place. Life didn’t give her a choice. At the age of 14 her parents, who had lived in Seattle for 10 years already, summoned her to join them.

Now 27, she recalls the moment vividly.

“It was really hard,” Lozano said. “I was 14… you think that your friends are everything.”

Lozano grappled with making new friends and missing her grandparents, who raised her in Mexico City. Even her 9-year-old sister was a stranger who spoke a language she had yet to master. Eager to escape from a world where she felt she didn’t belong, she resolved to move back to Mexico one day — a vow she finally fulfilled 13 years later.

Nelly Lozano, with her seven-month-old son Elian, gave up a secure, professional job in the U.S. to return to Mexico City and never looked back. (Photo by Alysa Hullett)
Nelly Lozano, with her seven-month-old son Elian, gave up a secure, professional job in the U.S. to return to Mexico City and never looked back. (Photo by Alysa Hullett)

A 2013 survey by the bi-national non-profit Mexicans and Americans Thinking Together (MATT) suggests that Lozano’s experience is fairly common — immigration divides a lot of Mexican families in one way or another.

“It used to be that you had a family structure,” Cristian Sandoval, Director of Strategy, Research and Development at MATT said. “Now, basically, the child is living with an uncle, or a grandma or a friend, and receiving instructions from a parent that is 1,000 miles away on the phone. In that situation, you have no social structure. No family structure.”

The problem is even more severe for undocumented immigrants, who often can’t risk going home for visits, Sandoval says.

The reverse migration trend exists, in part, because many like Lozano didn’t plan to stay in the U.S. in the first place. Only 16 percent of migrants in the MATT survey who returned to Mexico after living in the U.S. said they intended to stay in the states permanently.

Life as a young single mother tested Lozano, but by most conventional measures she succeeded, graduating from Renton Technical College and landing a job as a technical designer at Boeing.

Still, loneliness gnawed at her. On weeknights, she would pick her up son from the babysitter. “He already ate; I already ate. We would take a shower, read a book, maybe watch some TV, and go to bed.”

“Why do you live here if you’re not happy?”

Eventually, she said she realized she’d chosen to stay solely based on the unquestioned idea that life in the U.S. is somehow superior.

When her friend told her she could get her a job interview in Mexico, she jumped at the chance.

Many Mexicans who return from abroad struggle to navigate the job market again, where starting wages are much lower than in the U.S., MATT director Cristian Sandoval said. With her education, Lozano didn’t have that problem.

She got the job as a sales assistant — despite her lack of experience in that field — at Neuronix Medical, a company geared toward treating Alzheimer’s Disease. It paid less, but she could work less and spend more time with her son.

Once again, though, she felt like an outsider; only this time, in her own country.

“Even though I’m from here, there’s lots of things you forget,” she said. She accidentally called her basket of crispy, breaded chicken “nuggets,” and people squinted at her in confusion. She couldn’t even remember the Spanish term.

“Oh… you must come from the U.S.?” they would assume, laughing.

Customers at the Carniceria El Paisano in White Center, in front of a wall of phone cards for calling back to Mexico. There are plenty of businesses like this one in the Northwest, catering to Mexican immigrants but homesickness still takes its toll. (Photo by Alysa Hullett)
Customers at the Carniceria El Paisano in White Center, in front of a wall of phone cards for calling back to Mexico. There are plenty of businesses like this one in the Northwest, catering to Mexican immigrants but homesickness still takes its toll. (Photo by Alysa Hullett)

Four years later she says she fits in more now. Her Mexican accent is back, as is her tolerance for the overflowing sidewalks of Mexico City.

She also has since received a promotion at her job. She now has more time to spend with her 9-year-old son, Ivan, her 7-month-old, Elian, and her boyfriend, Israel.

She smiles and coos at her cradled baby in the living room, underneath wall decals that read, in English: “live well, laugh often, love much.”

Despite her confessed aversion to her time in the states, Lozano maintains that “life always puts you in the right places. It was a good experience and it helped me grow.”

While Lozano admittedly detested the U.S., Dulce Tabares Diaz was instantly enamored with it.

Now back in Guadalajara, the 34-year-old places a perfectly manicured hand on the head of her 11-year-old son. She describes the people she met in the Northwest as warm, and the new world as exciting.

She even loved her jobs at Burger King and McDonald’s, where she cooked and worked the register.

Dulce, which means “sweet,” in Spanish, has a disposition as sugary as her name suggests — but with a hardened outer coating.

After three years living in Issaquah and Renton, missing home, she decided to go back to Guadalajara for visit.

Little did she know she’d never be able to return to the U.S.

While attempting to cross the border at Nogales, Arizona, to sneak into Mexico, Tabares Diaz found herself incarcerated at the hands of “la migra.” Discovering she was undocumented, U.S. immigration held her for two months in a jail in Phoenix before she was finally deported, she says.

After three years working in Washington, Dulce Tabares Diaz was arrested crossing back into Mexico for a visit and permanently deported. She says she initially had trouble reintegrating in Mexico. (Photo by Alysa Hullett)
After three years working in Washington, Dulce Tabares Diaz was arrested crossing back into Mexico for a visit and permanently deported. She says she initially had trouble reintegrating in Mexico. (Photo by Alysa Hullett)

While she found it a predominantly “ugly” experience, it may be a testament to her character that she managed to find the people there “welcoming” and even “friendly.”

When Tabares Diaz finally did get out of her cell and back to Mexico, she found herself in a new world with grave employment prospects.

Sandoval says finding work is especially challenging for deported immigrants, who may be stigmatized and generally have trouble integrating back into society upon their return.

According to a MATT survey, just over half of all Mexicans who spent time in the U.S. reported a better economic situation once they returned to Mexico.

“On one hand, we have immigrants going back with financial resources,” Sandoval said, “who start businesses and finally retire after a long stay in the U.S. They contribute positively to the economy, building houses and setting up businesses.”

Then, he says there’s another group, “who need to learn how to navigate the country again.”

MATT helps returning migrants locate jobs by requiring immigrants to complete an assessment of their skills upon returning. The database then matches them with applicable and available jobs.

After almost a year of relentlessly searching, Tabares Diaz worked at a butcher shop and made extra money selling candy and snacks at her brother’s business.

Now, after a several month-long certification course, she works as a professional at “Todo para sus Pies,” an upscale health-focused foot spa.

“A lot of people ask me why I came back if there’s a ‘better life’ over there.”

She says that even if she hadn’t been detained at the border before attempting to visit her family, she would have returned for her sons eventually. Mexico, inevitably, remains her home.

Despite her decision to opt for Mexican life as well, Lozano said she still thinks the idea of the U.S. as a “promised land” exists for the majority of Mexicans who haven’t immigrated.

“A lot of people ask me why I came back if there’s a ‘better life’ over there,” she said. “I think people aren’t wrong when they say jobs are better, but everyday expenses and visits to any health care provider are more expensive.”

The narrative in Mexico has shifted from a few years ago, says migration expert Michael S. Rendall. Previously, the desire to go to the U.S. was an overwhelming social norm, especially in small-town migrant regions, he said. “Now, we can see that’s not the case.”

“Probably, the idea of the promised land still exists because people have the idea, unconsciously, that grass is always greener on the other side of the fence,” Lozano said.

But increasingly, Mexicans seem to be choosing to stick with the grass they know.

Spanish version:

(Photo by Quinn Dombrowski via Flickr)
(Photo by Quinn Dombrowski via Flickr)

Separados de la familia y extrañando su cultura, volver a casa es una opción fácil para muchos inmigrantes mexicanos. Lo qué sucede cuando llegan allí no es tan fácil.

Natural de Ciudad de México, Nelly Lozano vivió lo que algunos consideran el sueño americano. Mientras tanto, ella en realidad soñaba con regresar a México.

Lozano tenía una educación universitaria, un trabajo muy bien pagado en Boeing que pagaba por un carro “casi nuevo” y una apacible y cómoda casa en Renton.

De acuerdo con una encuesta de 2014 de Pew Research Center un tercio de los mexicanos dicen que aprovecharían la oportunidad de emigrar a los EE.UU. si se les diera una oportunidad legal como a Lozano (y alrededor del 17 por ciento dice que se mudarían incluso sin documentación).

Lozano, por su parte, manejaba al trabajo cada día y de regreso a casa, todo por el bien del futuro de su hijo.

Después de años de repetición, cayó en la cuenta de que podía mantener a su hijo sin el carro casi-nuevo y un sueldo impresionante. Tal vez, pensó, podría pasar más tiempo con él que las preciosas pocas horas que su actual posición de 9-5 le permitía.

“¿Qué estás haciendo aquí?”, Se preguntó. “¿Por qué vives aquí si no eres feliz? – Si no estás completamente satisfecha?”

Así que en el 2011, se fue.

Miles de mexicanos, a través de clases y edades, niveles de educación y estatus legales hacen lo mismo cada año, optando por regresar a casa de los EE.UU.

Most Mexicans Would Not Move to U.S.

La transición puede ser no tan sencilla, sin embargo. Los inmigrantes que regresan enfrentan una serie de desafíos: encontrar trabajo, reintegrarse en sus comunidades o incluso enfrentan estigmas.

Aún así, muchos están de acuerdo: vale la pena.

“La gente puede pensar, ¿Qué estás haciendo? Si te mudas de regreso “, dijo Lozano. “Como si fueras estúpido .Tienes un buen trabajo. Tienes una escuela para su hijo. Todas esas cosas buenas, ¿no? Todas esas oportunidades”.

“Pero si no eres feliz,” dijo ella, “estás cumpliendo con los puntos de vista de otras personas, entonces eso no es bueno.”

Alrededor del 90 por ciento de los aproximadamente 1,4 millones de inmigrantes mexicanos que regresaron a casa de los EE.UU. entre 2005 y 2010 lo hicieron voluntariamente (en lugar de a través de la deportación). Algunos encontraron menos prosperidad económica de lo que imaginaban. Otros experimentaron alienación irreparable. Algunos, como Lozano, dicen que ellos solo extrañaban a sus familias y la cultura.

El experto en migración mexicana de Pew, Jeffrey Passel, dice que la tasa de migración neta entre los EE.UU. y México se mantuvo cercana a cero hasta el 2012, y que la evidencia sugiere que hoy en día sigue siendo igual.

A diferencia de algunos mexicanos que emigran a los EE.UU., Lozano dice que nunca quiso venir en primer lugar. La vida no le dio una elección. A la edad de 14, sus padres, que habían vivido en Seattle hacía 10 años, le hicieron un llamado para unirse a ellos.

Ahora de 27 años de edad, recuerda vívidamente el momento.

“Fue muy duro”, dijo Lozano. “Yo tenía 14 años … uno piensa que sus amigos son todo.”

Lozano lidió con crear nuevas amistades y la pérdida de sus abuelos, quienes la criaron en la Ciudad de México. Incluso su hermana de 9 años de edad, era como una extraña que hablaba un idioma que ella aún tenía que dominar. Ansiosa por escapar de un mundo al que sentía que no pertenecía, decidió regresar a México algún día – un voto que finalmente cumplió 13 años más tarde.

Nelly Lozano, with her seven-month-old son Elian, gave up a secure, professional job in the U.S. to return to Mexico City and never looked back. (Photo by Alysa Hullett)
Nelly Lozano, with her seven-month-old son Elian, gave up a secure, professional job in the U.S. to return to Mexico City and never looked back. (Photo by Alysa Hullett)

Una encuesta de 2013 de la binacional sin fines de lucro Mexicans and Americans Thinking Together (MATT) sugiere que la experiencia de Lozano es bastante común – la inmigración divide a una gran cantidad de familias mexicanas en una forma u otra.

“Solía ​​ser que usted tenía una estructura familiar”, dijo Cristian Sandoval, Director de Estrategia, Investigación y Desarrollo en MATE. “Ahora, básicamente, el niño vive con un tío o una abuela o un amigo, y recibe instrucciones de un padre que está a más de 1.000 kilómetros de distancia en el teléfono. En esa situación, usted no tiene ninguna estructura social. Ninguna estructura familiar”.

El problema es aún más grave para los inmigrantes indocumentados, que a menudo no pueden arriesgarse a ir a casa para visitar, dice Sandoval.

Existe la tendencia de migración a la inversa, en parte, porque muchos como Lozano no tenían la intención de permanecer en los EE.UU. en primer lugar. Sólo el 16 por ciento de los migrantes de la encuesta MATT que regresó a México después de haber vivido en los EE.UU., dijo que la intención de permanecer en los estados era de forma permanente.

La vida como una joven madre soltera puso aprueba a Lozano, pero bajo la mayoría de las medidas convencionales, ella tuvo éxito, graduándose de Renton Technical College y conseguiendo un trabajo como diseñadora técnica de Boeing.

Aún así, la soledad la corroía. En los días de semana, ella recogería a su hijo de la niñera. “Él ya había comido; Yo ya había comido. Tomaríamos una ducha, leeríamos un libro, tal vez veríamos la TV, e iríamos a la cama.”

“¿Por qué vives aquí si no eres feliz?”

Finalmente, dijo que se dio cuenta de que había elegido quedarse únicamente en base a la idea incuestionable que la vida en los EE.UU. era de alguna manera superior.

Cuando su amigo le dijo que podía conseguirle una entrevista de trabajo en México, ella no dejó pasar la oportunidad.

Muchos mexicanos que regresan del extranjero luchan para navegar el mercado de trabajo de nuevo, donde los salarios iniciales son mucho menores que en los EE.UU., dijo Cristian Sandoval, director de MATT. Con su educación, Lozano no tiene ese problema.

Ella consiguió un trabajo como asistente de ventas – a pesar de su falta de experiencia en este campo – en Neuronix Medical, una empresa orientada hacia el tratamiento de la enfermedad de Alzheimer. Paga menos, pero puede trabajar menos y pasar más tiempo con su hijo.

Una vez más, sin embargo, se sentía como un extraña; sólo que esta vez, en su propio país.

“Aunque yo soy de aquí, hay un montón de cosas que se olvidan”, dijo. Accidentalmente llamó a su cesta de empanadas de pollo “nuggets”, y la gente entrecerró los ojos con confusión. Ni siquiera podía recordar el término en español.

“Oh … usted debe provenir de los EE.UU.?” asumirían, riendo.

Customers at the Carniceria El Paisano in White Center, in front of a wall of phone cards for calling back to Mexico. There are plenty of businesses like this one in the Northwest, catering to Mexican immigrants but homesickness still takes its toll. (Photo by Alysa Hullett)
Customers at the Carniceria El Paisano in White Center, in front of a wall of phone cards for calling back to Mexico. There are plenty of businesses like this one in the Northwest, catering to Mexican immigrants but homesickness still takes its toll. (Photo by Alysa Hullett)

Cuatro años más tarde, dice que encaja más ahora. Su acento mexicano está de vuelta, como su tolerancia a las aceras desbordantes de la Ciudad de México.

También ha recibido desde entonces una promoción en su trabajo. Ahora tiene más tiempo para estar con su hijo Iván de e 9 años de edad, su hija de 7 meses de edad, Elian, y su novio, Israel.

Ella sonríe y arrulla a su bebé acunado en la sala de estar, debajo de etiquetas de la pared que dicen en Inglés: “vive bien, ríe a menudo, ama mucho.”

A pesar de confesar su aversión a su tiempo en los E.E.U.U, Lozano sostiene que “la vida siempre te pone en los lugares correctos. Fue una buena experiencia y me ayudó a crecer”.

Si bien es cierto Lozano admite que detestaba los EE.UU., Dulce Tabares Díaz se enamoró instantáneamente de el.

Ahora, de vuelta en Guadalajara, y de 34 años de edad, coloca una mano perfectamente cuidada en la cabeza de su hijo de 11 años de edad. Ella describe a las personas que conoció en el noroeste como cálidas, y el nuevo mundo tan apasionante.

Aún le encantan sus puestos de trabajo en Burger King y McDonald’s, donde ella cocinaba y trabajaba en la caja.

Dulce, tiene una disposición tan azucarada como su nombre lo indica – pero con un revestimiento exterior endurecido.

Después de tres años de residir en Issaquah y Renton, echando de menos a su hogar, decidió regresar a Guadalajara de visita.

Poco sabía que nunca sería capaz de regresar a los EE.UU.

Al intentar cruzar la frontera en Nogales, Arizona, para colarse en México, Tabares Díaz fue encarcelada a manos de “la migra”. Descubriendo que era indocumentada, US inmigración la mantuvo durante dos meses en una cárcel en Phoenix antes de que ella fuera finalmente deportada, dice.

After three years working in Washington, Dulce Tabares Diaz was arrested crossing back into Mexico for a visit and permanently deported. She says she initially had trouble reintegrating in Mexico. (Photo by Alysa Hullett)
After three years working in Washington, Dulce Tabares Diaz was arrested crossing back into Mexico for a visit and permanently deported. She says she initially had trouble reintegrating in Mexico. (Photo by Alysa Hullett)

Aunque le resultaba una experiencia predominantemente “fea”, puede ser un testimonio de su personalidad de que se las arregló para encontrar a las personas allí “acogedoras” y hasta “amistosas”.

Cuando Tabares Díaz finalmente salió de su celda y de regreso a México, se encontró en un nuevo mundo con perspectivas de empleo graves.

Sandoval dice encontrar trabajo es especialmente difícil para inmigrantes deportados que pueden ser estigmatizados y por lo general tienen problemas para integrarse nuevamente en la sociedad a su regreso.

Según una encuesta de MATT, poco más de la mitad de todos los mexicanos que pasaron tiempo en los EE.UU. inforaron una mejor situación económica, una vez que regresaron a México.

“Por un lado, tenemos los inmigrantes que vuelven con recursos financieros”, dijo Sandoval, “que inician negocios y finalmente se retiran después de una larga estancia en los EE.UU. Ellos contribuyen positivamente a la economía, la construcción de viviendas y la creación de empresas.”

Entonces, él dice, hay otro grupo, “que necesita aprender a navegar por el país de nuevo.”

MATT ayuda a los migrantes que regresan a localizar trabajos exigiendo a los inmigrantes a completar una evaluación de sus habilidades al regresar. La base de datos luego los comparada con los puestos de trabajo aplicables y disponibles.

Después de casi un año de buscar sin descanso, Tabares Díaz trabajó en una carnicería y ganó dinero extra vendiendo dulces y aperitivos en el negocio de su hermano.

Ahora, después de un curso de certificación de varios meses de largo, ella trabaja como un profesional en “Todo para Sus Pies”, un exclusivo spa para pies enfocado en la salud.

“Mucha gente me pregunta por qué regresé si hay una vida mejor allá.”

Ella dice que aunque no hubiera sido detenida en la frontera antes al intentar visitar a su familia, ella habría regresado a sus hijos eventualmente. México, inevitablemente, sigue siendo su casa.

A pesar de su decisión de optar por la vida mexicana, Lozano dijo que todavía piensa que la idea de los EE.UU. como una “tierra prometida” existe para la mayoría de los mexicanos que no han emigrado.

“Mucha gente me pregunta por qué regresé si hay una vida mejor allá”, dijo. “Creo que la gente no se equivoca cuando dice que los empleos son mejores, pero los gastos diarios y visitas a cualquier proveedor de atención de salud son más costosas.”

La narrativa en México ha cambiado desde hace unos años, dice el experto en migración Michael S. Rendall. Anteriormente, el deseo de ir a los EE.UU. era una norma social abrumadora, especialmente en las regiones de migrantes de pueblos pequeños, dijo. “Ahora, podemos ver que ya no es el caso.”

“Probablemente, la idea de la tierra prometida aún existe porque la gente tiene la idea, inconscientemente, que la pastura es siempre más verde al otro lado de la valla”, dijo Lozano.

Pero cada vez más, los mexicanos parecen estar eligiendo apegarse a la pastura que conocen.

4 Comments

  1. "Thousands of other Mexicans, across classes and ages, education levels and legal statuses take the same plunge each year, opting to return home from the U.S."

    Good riddance.

  2. tento 30 anos en los Estados Unidos,ya me acostunbre a estar separado de la familiaen Mexico.mi vida a sido de altas y bajas economicamente,ya lo tomo de natural un dia tienes dinero otro dia usas la tarjeta de credito para seguir endogrado hasta la culata.

  3. A partir de este verano del dos mil quince han agravar las ofertas en servicios y construcción, en menor
    medida se están creando en industrica y logistica.
    Entendemos que puede ser debido al agrandamiento de creditos por parte
    de los bancos.
    8ca6de28fc0a82030955bf24bfc542fd

  4. I think you miss a point of part of the article. If you look at the direction the US is going vs the rest of the world this is not a good sign for those of us here. The US has continually been out of step with work and family life ratio and as pointed out even if the job pays more if everything else cost more then are you really richer? Given this pace you better hope Mexico doesn’t hold the same feelings as your comment when you try to emigrate to Mexico or whenever illegally in 10-15 years when one doctors office visit for a cold or flue will cost you a years salary.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.